About

Established by the Laogai Research Foundation in 2008, the mission of the Laogai Museum to document and expose the Laogai, China’s vast and brutal system of forced-labor prison camps.  Opened to the public in April 2011, our newly redesigned museum in the Dupont Circle area serves as a space for education, advocacy, and dialogue about human rights in China. Furthermore, it preserves the memory of the Laogai’s victims and raises awareness about the ongoing abuses of the Chinese Communist Party against its own people.

The museum style is bold, modern and engaging; it includes video interviews, short documentaries, Communist Party documents and prison artifacts. With free entry, self-guided tours, and bilingual signage, it is an ideal museum for visitors from the US and abroad who are interested in DC’s role in international advocacy, as well as DC residents seeking to hear an alternative voice about China.

Click here for more information about visiting the Laogai Museum, or Contact Us.  You can also follow us at twitter.com/LaogaiMuseum, or like us at facebook.com/LaogaiMuseum.

Learn more about life inside China’s Laogai prisons and how forced-labor products make their way into stores all over the world in Al Jazeera’s special program Slavery, A 21st Century Evil: Prison Slaves, with Laogai Museum founder Harry Wu.

Comments
  1. [...] Laogai Museum at 20th & S Street NW has been in the Dupont area for only a year, but offers a sober education on labor camps in China. [...]

  2. [...] Melissa Chan, the first foreign journalist expelled in 14 years, had reported for Al-Jazeera since 2007, garnering international recognition for her coverage of human rights in China, particularly the widespread use of “black jails” and forced labor camps. Though it is not clear why Ms. Chan specifically was denied a new visa, a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman responding to questions on the matter indicated that journalists are expected to follow “relevant laws and regulations,” while neglecting to specify which, if any, laws were broken in the course of Al-Jazeera’s English language broadcasts. Some have speculated that this move was made in response to a hard-hitting documentary Al-Jazeera aired last fall, profiling China’s use of a prison system of forced labor camps collectively known as the Laogai system. [...]

  3. [...] Melissa Chan, the first foreign journalist expelled in 14 years, had reported for Al-Jazeera since 2007, garnering international recognition for her coverage of human rights in China, particularly the widespread use of “black jails” and forced labor camps. Though it is not clear why Ms. Chan specifically was denied a new visa, a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman responding to questions on the matter indicated that journalists are expected to follow “relevant laws and regulations,” while neglecting to specify which, if any, laws were broken in the course of Al-Jazeera’s English language broadcasts. Some have speculated that this move was made in response to a hard-hitting documentary Al-Jazeera aired last fall, profiling China’s use of a prison system of forced labor camps collectively known as the Laogai system. [...]

  4. Kathleen Gallo says:

    This is a museum you should not miss.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s